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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
religion correspondent lauren green is here next. it's a pig fight, a family forced out of their home over their pet. the controversy behind this coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! no no no! not today! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dikembe mutumbo blocking a shot. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> welcome back. time for your shot of the morni morning. [cat meowing] >> cats and dogs calling a truce. and the cat is herding the puppies. >> in a reversal of the natural order, it's a cat herding puppies. >> clayton: amazing, one wary dog, i don't know about this, is he leading me into a trap. this video of course -- this video h
that two weeks ago true religion, the jeans company announced it wouldn't be renewing its contract with its founder and now former ceo who stepped down this tuesday. today we found out from the "new york post" those firms true religion is trying to sell itself to might be getting out of the bidding. an unexpected leadership change is rarely a sign good things are happening. of course, not all unexpected ceo departures are negative. when a bad ceo gets the boot, see you later, that's always a good thing. hence why we have the "mad money" wall of shame to call out these incompetents. sometimes the boards need to see them on the wall of shame to get motivated. everybody already understands that things are going poorly. for example, the dog that is groupon roared after it announced its foolish founder and ceo andrew mason was being axed at the end of february. same thing happened to avon when wall of shamer andrea young was forced to resign as ceo last april and had to step down as chairman in october. what about when a good ceo leaves, or a great one? we never like losing a talented manager. i
reminiscing and thinking about the role of religion. it is an important piece for her. >> asked up his neck. >> first of all -- next up is nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great row graham. i am glad you are part of -- program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our , we have an centers plaque. an a book where you get impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection with maryland. she wa
and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland. hi, nick. >> hi, how are you? first of all, thank you, c-span, for this great program. mr. smith, i'm very excited to get through. i think your work is great and i'm glad you're part of this series as well. two things i hope to get you to comment on. i live in calvert county. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors if not the first governor. there is not a sources linking her here. in the town center, there is a placard talking about her he had readty to the area. and there is an impression of louisa catherine that she is very much involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it's just on the surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises made during this time. would both of you mind commenting on those two things? >> the johnsons we wish to explain are louisa catherine's birth family. connections in calvert county, maryland, do you know of them? >> yes, her f
on race or gender or sexual orientation or religion or national origin. but it can say for example we will operate this company more efficiently and give the shareholders a greater return on equity if we hire people within this range off, fill in the blanks, for blood pressure and weight because we are now forced to provide you with out care, this is i a more efficient class of people for whom to provide health care. can they do that, yes. dagen: don't you think they are asking for the ire of people around the country and accusations of discrimination in some way? >> not all discrimination is prohibited by law. the only discrimination is the basis by which we talked about. and we know those, gender, race, age, religion, etc. but on the base of health is not prohibited by law. with this exception. the americans for disability act prohibits discriminating against someone because they have an articulable disability. a physical disability, emotional or mental disability. high blood pressure or heavyweight is not immeasurable disability. connell: not taking care of yourself is not a disabi
celebrated the end of winter and now lint. religions, agan they consumed vast quantities of pancakes. more russians are embracing christianity. we get a report now. >> it's a time of prayer for russia's orthodox faithful. a preparation for lint, a holy eriod of abstinence. there are many churches shuttered. now the towns are pilgrimages for russia's increasingly spiritual society. >> newcomers found their place n life through the church. >> and it is also famous for its festival, a chance for everyone to feast, while others fast. >> the most important thing is, of course, is the spiritual development rather than simply dieting. people should go to church, rad read the bible, think about their sins, their soles -- souls and confess and with a clean soul you can break your fast. >> age old traditions attract the croused. some had come to watch. others to take part. >> we are very happy to be here. it's our all slavic land. we're going to different churches here and we wanted to be together for lint. together there is ritual strength. >> the festival calls for joy and laughter before the seri
've been in rome watching the new pope be selected. so i've been there getting religion and i've sort of lost sight what's going on in washington. give me an update of what i have missed. >> there's no white smoke coming out of the rnc building yet charlie i will tell you that. >> rose: what about the whitehouse. >> or the whitehouse. there's a great deal of ferment going on in the republican party right now which i think by and rge is healthy. there's a cole caveats now but the previous report on immigration i think a lot of things are happening. rand paul today came out for at least legal status for immigrants. so i think some people thought after this last election debalk backal will be pointing fingers and there's a lot of that going on. some of this stuff i think is productive for them now. putting a paper together the way actually doing some of this stuff. for instance it says we can't be a party of universal purity. yes we can all agree on that. it may be harder when they get to the caucuses. >> rose: are you watching or seeing each of the possible canned dates in 2016 stakin
of religion or faith and that causes the tradition and women to the to be limited or the girl or a child not to be sent to school and therefore we issued a strong statement of the elders about three years ago now saying that the leaders should champion the quality of girls and women that should be part of their spirituality and their faith and most of them are men. [applause] and then we said that's all very well but what are we going to do practically? and that brought us to the early child marriage issue and because marriage isn't a private thing it is sanctioned in some religious way and therefore it was a good example. i was aware of the expense of this in certain countries but by and large we underestimated and the archbishop is honest about saying that he totally underestimated the numbers that we are talking about. 10 million girls a year. that is 100 million girls in a decade or married without their consent, and very often without their knowledge on today itself way before they are ready for it physically or emotionally. we went to ethiopia where blah, -- the blah is and they we
time. i'm not accusing everybody who's against gay marriage as bigotry. it's true that some religions treat that, which may or may not be bigotry. >> this case is the fact that the equal protection clause will create a new class. >> that's the state of this country, and individuals have a right to be treated the same way as everybody else. and that is at the core of this debate. >> a tricky question. but it violates the equal protection clause. you have to create a new class of people. >> do we need more individual rights, or is this a question about marriage? those are two different -- they may be related, but they're two different things. >> that's a very important question. the question before the supreme court, regardless of who's changing their mind on it or whose loved one is gay. who among us doesn't have a loved one who's gay. that's a given. the question is whether the 14th amendment clause should create a new class of people? the supreme court hasn't done that in 30 years. >> it's about whether the equal protection clause protects people who have the right to marry. >> that'
with religion and so that's where we have the fundamental disagreement. >> which may be part of the problem. i think everybody should be able to be married civilly perhaps, but only some then have a religious ceremony. >> we'll take that. that's all we want. >> religious has a connotation. that's the distinction. >> if the catholic church says they support full civil rights, equal rights for same-sex partners, but they don't want it called marriage in the church, we'd take it. that would be fantastic. >> does it seem like that is exactly what he was doing? >> he hasn't said that publicly. perhaps said it privately. >> in the bishops conference meeting, he said it. >> it's a different prism that they are doing everything through. the prism through the archbishop of buenos aires is different than pope. >> and smaller group of people than the 1.2 billion throughout the world. >> i think we ultimately believe in separation of church and state and equal rights. i don't want a religious leader denying rights to people. >> i don't want to suggest that somehow i'm negative on it. if the new pope is wi
or seven categories which we are generally familiar. age, race, gender, religion, etc. does not prohibit discrimination based on size. liz: so this is a private company and they are loud to do whatever they want. obesity is not in there in terms of discrimination. >> you're not going to want to hear this. a judge will be deciding what is obese. is it 5 pounds, 50 pounds, does obesity come under the americans with disabilities act. another federal statute that had decisions based on disability. this is enormously complex and contract with the president said, far more expensive. stuart: it is not really complicated, this is a bunch of obamacare. the ever rising cost of health care insurance which is worn by employers through the employers, so they have to get the cost down and you employ healthy people. >> obamacare forces the employer to provide for those who haven't received it enforces the employer to pay for the benefit the employee may never, ever use like abortion. so all those things raise costs. the employer wants to cut the cost, have people who work here who either pay for the li
of florida atlanta university. respects all religions and welcomes people of all faiths, background and beliefs. let us know what you think about this. you can weigh in on twitter. we are ff weekend and start using hash tag ff weekend so we can follow the conversation there this is how we follow it like this. >> alisyn: i understand. that makes perfect sense to me. meanwhile we have this fox news alert for you. because for the first time in four years. the u.s. senate has passed a budget. that's amazing. >> jessie: good job guys. >> the yeas are 50. the nays are 49. >> all nighter. voted on dozens of amendments in ending the passing with a judgment. elizabeth plan is live in washington with more. have you gotten any sleep? when you there watching the vote orama as they everywhere calling it? >> did i get a little bit of sleep it did take all night. with t. was a slow process. it is done. the senate approved the budget first time in four years. 3.7 trillion-dollar blueprint plan. the resolution raises nearly a trillion dollars in new taxes. it does so by closing some tax breaks for t
of life and every religion and if they are willing to work hard they can success. that has to be more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syria situation but the moment of promise and danger in the arab world in north africa. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern that the upheaval is creating extremism. how concerned are you that extremist could take over in syria and, perhaps worse than assad? i was hoping you could give us an insight on how you brokered the call to netanyahu. and you have offered asylum that he rejected and does that offer still stand? thank you. >> well, i'm very concerned about syria becoming a place for extremists. because extremists thrive in chaos. they thrive in failed states and in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to building things but they are good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functional. they fill that gap. that's why, i think it is so important for us to work with the international community to help accelerate a polit
. many of them are in the bill of rights. freedom of speech, religion, assembly, the press, the right to keep and bear arms -- [cheers and applause] i can't think of any of these at point that aren't under assault by a bunch of leftists that want to deconstruct america. and that does offend me. and so i think it's our job to step up and defend our values and defend the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism. i'll stand there with all of the people that want to rebrand the republican party to work on the economic side of this agenda, but i invite all of them to cover -- come over with all of us to work together on the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism including life and marriage and the rule of law. [applause] and on the life question, it's really pretty simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run aga
in their religion or in their experience, it is an extremely difficult thing to do. jon: marvin, i understand you can hear me now. >> i'm back. jon: good. >> i just answered his question. >> thank you very much. [laughter] jon: i have one for you, marvin, you you were saying the press should have been more skeptical. you had the director of the cia saying weapons of mass destruction a slam dunk in iraq, you had saddam apparently telling his own generals that he had weapons of mass destruction. you had colin powell going before the u.n. general assembly and saying, look, they've got all the parts and pieces they need to build weapons of mass destruction. how much more skeptical was the press supposed to be? >> well, you are setting up the bush administration's case for war in iraq. and the united states went to war in iraq. congress supported the president's policy on going to war, and the media supported it what this all adds up to, however, since it didn't work out that way, was that somebody got it drastically wrong. american intelligence got it wrong, the brits got it wrong, the israelis got i
. to stand with us on freedom of speech and freedom of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad
be global warming. >> real estate company just out -- >> going against the religion, get in trouble with who? the "new york times." go ahead. >> just out with the winter 2013 rent versus buy report. it says buying a home in the top 100 major metropolitan areas is cheaper despite rising home prices. joining us now from san francisco with more on the results, the chief economist. jet, am i getting your last name right on that? >> yes, you are, good morning. >> so, i was actually surprised by this. because i thought it was the opposite way around still. you would buy of the 100 metropolitan cities, would you buy everywhere? >> right now it's cheaper to buy than to rent in all of the 100 largest markets. when you take into account all of the costs and proceeds of both owning and renting. >> how are you making this calculation? what's the time horizon? there's got to be other things decides what it means from one year to one year. >> yeah, there's a lot going on under the hood. we're assuming you stay in your home for seven years, which has been the typical length of time that americans stay in a
come to you to talk about religion at all? guest: we would treat them -- that's another thing. -- re portrayed as just about oil and about greed, i take great exception to that. i believe it does a disservice to those men and women who went and volunteered to go, especially in our medical facilities. at one time, we were treating one of our wounded service members and the person who wounded him. and our folks gave the treatment that they were supposed to give. if anybody else in the world wants to throw stones at us in america, they can go right ahead, but i will point to those kinds of examples to show why we are the freest, greatest country in the world. when we go in -- we left. we did not take a part of iraq. we did not say this is going to be our little piece of ground did we did what we needed to do, and now we are gone -- of ground. andid what we needed to do now we are gone. we are out. iraq is a sovereign country. america, that is who we are. i think that needs to be communicated. host: clint in texas. a democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i just wanted to make a comment. i
. >> on sunday's "parade." country star brad paisley on romance, race, and religion. >> you've been waiting for that a long time, sam stein. congratulations. >> who? >> coming up a number one seed is almost knocked off by a 16 and big win for harvard. >> harvard! >> full highlights of round two of the ncaa tournament next in sports. ♪ acne cleansers may be tough on breakouts, but how good are they for the rest of your face? [ female announcer ] new neutrogena® naturals acne cream cleanser with acne-fighting medicine from the wintergreen leaf. this effective cleanser cleans into pores. treats and helps prevent future breakouts. without dyes, parabens, or harsh sulfates. for clear healthy skin. naturally clear skin has never felt so beautiful. [ female announcer ] new acne cream cleanser. only from neutrogena® naturals. [ female announcer ] new acne cream cleanser. it's not what you think. it's a phoenix with 4 wheels. it's a hawk with night vision goggles. it's marching to the beat of a different drum. and where beauty meets brains. it's big ideas with smaller footprints. and knowing the
of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad to talk about that today. but i do believe these connecti
to their religion or ethnicity, are starting to push back in some instances. there is a great deal of concern. i want to assure you, i mentioned i have met people the pre syrian army, and we have highlighted the worries of minority groups and christians, not that we are against the sunni majority of syria. we are not. the minorities are nervous and there might -- their rights must be protected and respected. we hear good things from them. i can tell you for example that they have met christian leaders from some of the communities in syria and have told us afterwards that their meetings were populated. we have to keep pushing in that direction. >> thank you. if you could touch on the chemical weapons issues. was called a red line and there have been reports as recently in the last 24 hours about what is actually happening on the ground, whether they have been used, whether they will be used. if you could just talk about what the administration is doing to prevent the transfer of these weapons to groups. thank you. >> we viewed this issue with extreme seriousness. it is incredibly important to us.
. it's a cross section of race, religion, color, age, you know, from a 20-year-old to a 70-year-old. and everybody needs that truck. and it's such a -- you know, it's a metaphor for the american dream and survival of the fittest. it starts out absurd because you're like what's the sport, you go like this. but, you know, 16 hours into it, you just desperately want everyone to win that truck. >> so i was asking how you came up with this idea. you're like straight out of broadway. you're not straight out of broadway. how did this happen? how did you guys come together? >> we met through a mutual friend and started writing songs, just songs. >> oh, really? >> we actually live three blocks away from each other. >> oh, okay. that will do it. >> and we were having a great time writing songs and amanda asked me to join the team, the hardbody team and so off we went. >> what's it been like? >> it's been thrilling. >> i mean the difference especially from being in a band to now doing this? >> very different. well, it's been a roller coaster ride. it's a gigantic team of people working tog
that protects speech and religion but it protects association, it protects people coming together and making things happen in their community that wouldn't happen otherwise. americans give to these things like nobody else would every day. our religious institutions, our charities, our hospitals, our museums and others come together to take private resources and meet a number of community needs that are met in the best possible way by people who are doing that through a charitable effort. feeding the hungry, caring for the sick, serving the poor, educational institutions of all kinds undertaking critical research, money that goes to either help operate or actually support museums and parks. these are all the kinds of things that americans do because they give to charity. now, these things are so often done better than government bureaucracies would achieve this goal. cheaper, more effectively, more reasonably and -- and we need to do everything we can to continue to do that. in 2011, americans gave nearly $300 billion to charitable causes. 75% of that giving is done by individuals. of the 41
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)